Cadet Winton Fencing Tournament

Cadet Winton Fencing Tournament

Cadet Winton Fencing Tournament

Around mid December, each year, one of the most important team competitions of England's fencing calendar takes place at the Sports Academy Millfield, in Somerset.

The competition, Cadet Winton, is a team fencing event, set up 30 years ago by Sir Nicholas Winton and his brother Bobby, which pits various English regions in all 3 weapons (Sabre, Foil and Epee). Each UK region sends 6 teams of 3 or 4 fencers each (mens and womens, in each weapon). One region, the one with most wins gets the Cadet Winton Award for the year. The 30th edition was held on December 16th & 17th 2017 with the London Region Team winning the trophy.

Cadet Winton Fencing Tournament Two Bolingbroke Academy students were on the epee team this year; David Farmanfarmaian - Men, and Ariana Farmanfarmaian - Women) for the third year in a row. Reflecting their contribution to the London team, over the years, David and Ariana were given the honour of accepting the Winton Cadet trophy on behalf of London Region, from the children of Bobby Winton himself, and they get to keep it for the next year.

Cadet Winton Fencing Tournament A little British history: Sir Nicholas George Winton MBE was a British humanitarian (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nicholas_Winton) who organised the rescue of 669 children, most of them Jewish, from Czechoslovakia on the eve of the Second World War in an operation later known as the Czech Kindertransport. This was not widely known until his death, at which point he was named as the British Schindler by the U.K. media. For those who are not familiar with WW2 the Kindertransport (German for "children's transport") was an organised rescue effort that took place during the nine months prior to the outbreak of the Second World War (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kindertransport). The United Kingdom took in nearly 10,000 predominantly Jewish children from Germany, Austria, Czechoslovakia, Poland, and the Free City of Danzig. The children were placed in British foster homes, hostels, schools and farms. Often they were the only members of their families who survived the Holocaust.

  
Besides being a humanitarian, Nicholas Winton and his brother Bobby were also a fencer and the Cadet Winton competition honours both their names and his saving of so many young lives.
We are hugely proud of Bolingbroke Academy students not only being selected for such an important fencing competition but also being selected, by their teammates, for receiving the trophy on the 30th anniversary of a prize honouring such an humanitarian.